Tennis and the Color Green Are a Great Fit for St. Patrick’s Day

What would St. Patrick’s Day be without wearing green, thinking about shamrocks, four leaf clovers and all that goes with the holiday? Better yet, how does playing sports such as tennis, baseball, track, soccer and more fit into the “Wearing O’ the Green” theme?  As it turns out, sports and the color green are a perfect fit on March 17 in honor of the holiday. Please enjoy reading fun St. Patty’s Day facts and watching this Wearing O The Green Tennis & Sports Video: “Tennis Is My Sport.”

FUN FACTS ABOUT ST. PATRICK’S DAY

Why is it extraordinarily fun to wear green and play tennis? Consider it a possibility that a lively leprechaun might be sending you smiles from nearby court foliage. After all, one never knows where wee folk are hiding. Here are some fun facts regarding the holiday.

  • The color green is now seen in beer, leprechauns, hats and almost everything related to St. Patrick’s Day. It is also the color of Spring and the lush county sides of Ireland. It is believed to be a color that brings good luck to all who wear it.
  • The holiday owes it deepest origins to the coming of spring that will be Monday, March 20, 2017 at exactly 6:29am.
  • Ever get confused about the difference between four-leaf clovers and three-leaf shamrocks? The four-leaf clover can be ever present in our lawns and gardens. They represent the Celts, who were the solar-worshiping invaders of Ireland.
  • The Shamrock means “Little Clover” in Gaelic and is a symbol of the Christianity’s Holy Trinity (Father, Son and Holy Spirit), a story attributed to the Irish missionary St. Patrick.
  • Taylor Fritz. (SCTA Staff)

    The Pot of Gold is treasured by the “Wee Folk” and it’s a magical pot that represents the “Cauldron of Abundance” uniting the four elements: fire, earth, water and air. It also forms a metaphorical womb to represent the vessel of life.

  • The element of Irish “gold” comes through generations of lore and mystical story telling. It represents wealth, wisdom and knowledge.
  • Fanciful leprechauns are magical beings that are mostly male in the traditional form. They can be
    feisty, funny and often playful, and if the mood strikes, helpful. These red-bearded fairy folk are thought to be eternal as they perch on toadstools and selectively befriend human kind. 
  • Finally, legends say “St. Patrick’s Day” was named in honor of an Englishman born in Britain circa (389-461). He was kidnapped and sold into Irish servitude to be a shepherd. After escaping and returning to England, h e studied to become a priest and changed his name to “Patricus.” He later returned to Ireland to become a Christian missionary with the goal of dispelling pagan myths. St Patrick died on March, 17, 461. Today he is known as the Patron Saint of Ireland.

This festive holiday is now celebrated around the world. Whether you adopt some or all of its traditions, consider picking up a racket and playing tennis with friends. Don’t forget to wear something green!

Frances Tiafoe on the run (SCTA Staff)

 

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One Response

  1. Well done, Karen.

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